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Intersectionality

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Submitted By sunnymilk
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Intersectionality is the one of social theory-especially in feminism. This theory argues that social suppression runs by not only gender and ethnicity but also other various variables such as social class, age, sexuality, culture, religion, health status, financial condition, etc. In other words, the discrimination is not formed by just one factor but by several factors which indicate one’s identity. With blending those variables, one is discriminated against on many layers. For example, African-American, blue collar, old female experiences more severe discrimination than white female or African-American male. Historically, in the most of country, women could exercise their voting power decades after men got it. But not every woman got this right at the same time. For example, when there is a hot dispute in America about the vote of African-American and women, it was exclusive African-American female. In the end the dispute composed the vote of African-American ‘male’ or ‘white’ female.
As an Asian female, I also sometimes feel that I am marginalized in the group or society but not often so far. It is considered that my country, South Korea, is extremely patricentric and male-centric culture. Men always have to be a breadwinner in the family and that may the reason of those culture. I personally have seen many men who could not accept independent woman or successful women in the social status or financially. This male-centric culture has been changed slowly in the country during decades. However the weird part is when it moves to the multiracial country like U.S.A., it is getting worse. I’ve heard many stories how their parents are conservative and how many discrimination happens between men and women in the Asian-American society. It may be caused that during Asian men have tried to be recognized their masculinity and overcome the racism, they need to build a…...

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