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Combat Hiv/ Aids, Malaria and Other Diseases

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One of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is to "Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases". Their targets are to (1) Stop and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/ AIDS by 2015, (2) Attain universal access to treatment for HIV/AIDS for all the people who need it and (3) Stop and begin to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases by 2015. Globally, new HIV infections continue to decline in some regions dropping 21% from 2001 to 2011. More people are living with HIV due to fewer AIDS - related deaths because of the scaling up of antiretroviral therapy; the continued large number of new infections with 2.5 million people are newly infected each year. Comprehensive knowledge of HIV transmission remains low among young people, along with condom use. More orphaned children are now in school due to expanded efforts to mitigate the impact of AIDS (Goal 6, 2013).

While the target was missed by 2011, access to treatment for people living with HIV increased in all regions. At the end of 2011, 8 million people were receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV. This total constitutes an increase of over 1.4 million people from December 2010. By the end of 2011, eleven countries had achieved universal access to antiretroviral therapy (Goal 6, 2013).

The global estimated incidence of malaria has decreased by 17% since 2000, and malaria -specific mortality rates by 25%. In the decade since 2000, 1.1 million deaths from malaria were averted. Countries with improved access to malaria control intervention saw child mortality rates fall by about 20%. Treatment for tuberculosis has saved 20 million lives between 1995 and 2011 (Goal 6, 2013).

Meeting this goal will positively impact on the people's health, livelihood and emotional wellbeing. The recommendations would be more education on the disease and how it is transmitted. There should be…...

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