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According to Jung (Bandura Freud) Ego Is Everything

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By 4sunshine
Words 2094
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According to Jung the ego is everything that a person is conscious. The ego is concerned of the thinking process, feeling, remembering, and perceiving. It sees that the function of everyday life is carried out. It is responsible as well for our identity and sense of continuity in time. Not to compare the two of the ego and the psyche the psyche is both conscious and the substantial unconscious aspect of personality, more in as a complex personally disturbing a constellation of ideas. A complex has a very disproportionate influence on behavior. It occurs over and over again in our life. Such in a mother complex will spend time related to the idea of mother whereas the same in a father as in sex, power, money or any other complex. Jung didn't believe that the stages of development where important such as Freud. Jung defined the stages in terms of the focus of libidinal energy. Jung disagreed with Freud about the nature of the libido. Freud believed that the libido was mainly sexual in nature and how it was invested within the five years of life was determined by a large extent on what a individual adult personality would be like. He also believed that libidinal energy was directed simply toward whatever was important to the individual at the time and what was important changed as a function of a person's maturation. Jung believed that the libido as general biological life energy that is concentrated on different problems as they arise. Libido is the driving force behind the psyche which is focused on the various needs either biological or spiritual. The value of something is determined by how much libidinal energy is put into. Jung also believed that the Libido was the driving force for the personality of a person, and however much energy is put behind the force is how well the person’s libido is.stated by Hergenhahn and Olson (2007), Freud and Jung agreed on…...

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